January 2016. The 'holey sign' for the Bug-opolis. Above this, there are an increasing number of sticks being gathered, including ones with central holes for solitary bees to lay eggs. It is deliberately in a sunny position. We can put smaller ones in other spots with diferent heights and climates.

January 2016. The 'holey sign' for the Bug-opolis. Above this, there are an increasing number of sticks being gathered, including ones with central holes for solitary bees to lay eggs. It is deliberately in a sunny position. We can put smaller ones in other spots with diferent heights and climates.

We have a lot of bees of all species visiting the garden and would like to encourage more.

May 2016: we have mining bees in the garden (holes in the turf) and also solitary bees in the drilled logs in the Bugopolis.


Summer 2015: a bumblebee on a cornflower in the meadow.

Summer 2015: a bumblebee on a cornflower in the meadow.

We can:

Plant wisely - for nectar and pollen.


Provide water for them, including in a shallow nature pond or even an upturned dustbin lid with pebbles in it (good for birds too).


1 February 2016: three nest pots installed by the hedge, to the left of the entrance gate.

1 February 2016: three nest pots installed by the hedge, to the left of the entrance gate.

Provide habitats for them to overwinter like our Bug-opolis and Bumblebee nest pots.


Autumn 2015. This is a Warre top-bar beehive in a local garden. It has windows at the back and simple netting at the front (to lift the flying bees above your head). This type might be too top-heavy (and expensive) to have in the Nightingale garden. A horizontal top-bar can be made more easily, probably requires less intervention, can have windows and is probably a but more vandal-proof. We'd want stronger fencing/netting too.

Autumn 2015. This is a Warre top-bar beehive in a local garden. It has windows at the back and simple netting at the front (to lift the flying bees above your head). This type might be too top-heavy (and expensive) to have in the Nightingale garden. A horizontal top-bar can be made more easily, probably requires less intervention, can have windows and is probably a but more vandal-proof. We'd want stronger fencing/netting too.

Think about siting some beehives in the garden for honey bees. Some of the Nightingale gardeners are beekeepers and also some frequent park users.

We need to make sure we can do it safely first though and also that we have the right type of hive and place for the bees.

We'd like to make the beekeeping accessible for young people and especially people using wheelchairs, which will take some more thought and planning.


Useful links:

See the new Cambridge Wild webpage for useful links.

Last updated: 1 February 2017