We like wildflowers... but it is tricky to work out what is 'wild' and what is introduced to the garden.

One of our garden volunteers, Gill, carried out a very useful survey of the wildflowers in July and August 2016 - to be added soon.

From the British Wild Flowers website:

  • 'Native plants'... have 'been growing in the area without being introduced by man usually for many thousands of years... includes naturally occurring hybrids even if those have only recently been discovered'...
  • 'Archaeophyte... established plant believed to have been introduced by man before 1500 AD'.
  • 'Neophyte... introduced and naturalised after 1500 AD'.
  • 'Casual alien... grows in an area without being planted but fails to establish itself in the wild for very long'.

 

History

Summer 2014, long grass in the former bowls green

Summer 2014, long grass in the former bowls green

The bowling green was intensively cultivated for bowls-grade lawn until 2013 and then the area was locked for about a year. By mid-2014, the bowling green itself had become long grassland (see photo).


Orchids in the garden

Summer 2015, one of the stunning bee orchids in the grassland around the bowls green

Summer 2015, one of the stunning bee orchids in the grassland around the bowls green

When we first started to visit the green in January 2015, we found a small colony of bee orchids near some Swedish whitebeam trees. 

In December 2015, we found another small colony of bee orchids - saved from the ditching hoe!

In 2016, we only had two orchids in flower, apparently this is common.

There are colonies of bee orchids in at least four other places in the main park, some white helleborine orchids under beech trees in the playground and a single (not so) common spotted orchid in another place.


Chalk grassland

Summer 2015. One of the patches of chalk grassland flora.

Summer 2015. One of the patches of chalk grassland flora.

We also have lots of emerging chalk grassland plants around the bowling green. Like bird's foot trefoil, fumitory, ladies bedstraw, selfheal and yarrow.


Fungi

Autumn 2015: glistening ink cap fungi in the garden.

Autumn 2015: glistening ink cap fungi in the garden.

In Autumn 2015, we spotted some glistening ink cap near the bee orchids, under the whitebeam trees, after we had raked the leaves. They lasted about 3 days and then melted away - we hope they come back.


Spring 2015, some cowslips growing in the area near the club hut.

Spring 2015, some cowslips growing in the area near the club hut.

Spring flowers

By the end of January 2016, the primroses around the club hut have started to flower and also the cherry plum in the Bird Cafe.


Useful links

See the new CambridgeWild webpage for useful links.

Last updated: 1 February 2017